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playground:playground [2011/11/30 16:42]
Vincent
playground:playground [2015/01/31 23:55] (current)
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 thegeneralist@themoderngeneralist.com thegeneralist@themoderngeneralist.com
  
-**WHAT THE SIG IS LOOKING FOR**+**The general systems ​SIG invites contributions in the following areas:**
  
 Systems are ubiquitous and omnipresent throughout the hierarchic organization of material-reality,​ from protons composed of quarks to the infinite universe itself. To incorporate this vast range of different types of systems, a general theory of systems would be, of necessity, a transdisciplinary form of understanding. Systems are ubiquitous and omnipresent throughout the hierarchic organization of material-reality,​ from protons composed of quarks to the infinite universe itself. To incorporate this vast range of different types of systems, a general theory of systems would be, of necessity, a transdisciplinary form of understanding.
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 **//The SIG, then, is looking for papers and presentations that identify system components—subsystems and interrelations between them—particularly those subsystems and interrelations that can be demonstrated to be isomorphic among a variety of different systems.//​** **//The SIG, then, is looking for papers and presentations that identify system components—subsystems and interrelations between them—particularly those subsystems and interrelations that can be demonstrated to be isomorphic among a variety of different systems.//​**
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 A system is a group of interrelating components that continues to exist as a group of interrelating components over some relevant period of time. This continuance of the identity of the group of interrelating components as a system is a consequence of the nature of the interrelations between the subunits of the system. The intrinsic nature of the subunits determine the intrinsic nature of the relations they can have with other subunits. Thus there is the development from the nature of the units to the nature of the relations to the nature of the system as a whole. A system is a group of interrelating components that continues to exist as a group of interrelating components over some relevant period of time. This continuance of the identity of the group of interrelating components as a system is a consequence of the nature of the interrelations between the subunits of the system. The intrinsic nature of the subunits determine the intrinsic nature of the relations they can have with other subunits. Thus there is the development from the nature of the units to the nature of the relations to the nature of the system as a whole.
  
 **//The SIG is looking for papers and presentations that identify this developmental sequence that results in the emergence of the intrinsic structure and processes of the system, and thereby results in the emergence of the system as a whole, a system with ongoing continuance of its identity as a system.//** **//The SIG is looking for papers and presentations that identify this developmental sequence that results in the emergence of the intrinsic structure and processes of the system, and thereby results in the emergence of the system as a whole, a system with ongoing continuance of its identity as a system.//**
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 Systems come in seemingly unlimited diversity. Within this diversity there are evident types of systems, (a) atomic systems from hydrogen to the heavy elements, (b) molecular systems from simple molecules such as water to the complexity of proteins, (c) chemical systems from the depositional systems within geodes to the chemistry of life, (d) planetary systems such as global weather patterns and plate tectonics, (e) social systems, (f) ecosystems, (g) solar systems, and (h) galactic systems. This list, as stated, represents a traditional generalist view of the different types of systems, based in large part on the various hierarchical levels of material-reality. Systems come in seemingly unlimited diversity. Within this diversity there are evident types of systems, (a) atomic systems from hydrogen to the heavy elements, (b) molecular systems from simple molecules such as water to the complexity of proteins, (c) chemical systems from the depositional systems within geodes to the chemistry of life, (d) planetary systems such as global weather patterns and plate tectonics, (e) social systems, (f) ecosystems, (g) solar systems, and (h) galactic systems. This list, as stated, represents a traditional generalist view of the different types of systems, based in large part on the various hierarchical levels of material-reality.
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 **//The SIG would like to see papers and presentations that identify types of systems based on the intrinsic systemic qualities of the systems.//​** **//The SIG would like to see papers and presentations that identify types of systems based on the intrinsic systemic qualities of the systems.//​**
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 The names of isomorphies,​ system components, and different types of systems all contribute to the developing vocabulary of a transdisciplinary language. The reality-referents of these terns do not exist in isolation. Isomorphic patterns-of-organization,​ system structures and processes, and various types of systems all occur together in specific patterns of interrelation. The transition from the nature of the component units of a system, to the consequent nature of the relations between those units, to the consequent nature of the pattern-of-organization of the system as a whole is an example. Within this example there are two universal omnipresent factors that determine the syntax of this transdisciplinary language: The names of isomorphies,​ system components, and different types of systems all contribute to the developing vocabulary of a transdisciplinary language. The reality-referents of these terns do not exist in isolation. Isomorphic patterns-of-organization,​ system structures and processes, and various types of systems all occur together in specific patterns of interrelation. The transition from the nature of the component units of a system, to the consequent nature of the relations between those units, to the consequent nature of the pattern-of-organization of the system as a whole is an example. Within this example there are two universal omnipresent factors that determine the syntax of this transdisciplinary language:
playground/playground.txt · Last modified: 2015/01/31 23:55 (external edit)